Wednesday, December 28, 2016

New for 2017 - Individual Lesson Plans!

Hello Artists,
I’m excited to let you know about new classes I’m going to start in 2017. Unlike the Online Mentoring Program where the classes were predesigned, these classes will be designed for you, based on your short term and long term goals. We start each week with a quick Skype chat about your goal for the week. Once your work is complete, you send digital images to me so I can review. Then, at a scheduled time, we’ll have a 20-30 min. discussion while you watch me work directly on your image! This way, you will have a before and after image of your painting. Both programs are $250 per month. The individual lessons can be on a month by month basis for a length of time of your choosing.

You can read about both programs on my website and then decide which would be best for you.
https://kimcasebeer.com/…/2017-online-mentoring-program-and…

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions that you have. I’m excited about the opportunity to being able to work more directly with you!

video

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Small, Intensive Workshop just added for Oct. 5 and 6, 2016. 5 students maximum.

This workshop is set up as an intensive workshop for only 5 students so that each student can work on their goals for 1 1/2 days.

Skill level:  Intermediate drawing and painting knowledge.
Class size:  5
Medium:  Oil, Pastel, Acrylic
Hours on Wednesday 10/5:  5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Hours on Thursday 10/6:  7:30 am - 3:30 pm
Tuition: $250 per person

To register, contact: 
Kim Casebeer at kimcasebeer@att.net or call 785-409-8949.  I will send out a Paypal invoice or you can pay by check.  The first 5 students to pay will have a spot in the class.

We meet at my home/studio: 3600 Ian Circle, Manhattan, KS  66503 on Wednesday night, and will decide where to meet Thursday morning.

Wednesday night we meet promptly at 5:30 in my studio to go over design, discover the importance of notans and value studies, and discuss color theory.  We will work on both value studies and color studies so bring a light plein air set up to the studio.

Thursday morning we will meet at 7:30 am, probably in one of the hotel parking lots in Blue Earth Place, 3rd and Colorado.  We will drive south out of town from there to get to our spot and set up by 8:00 am.   I will demo, then work with individuals at their easels until 12:30.  Meet back at my home/studio from 1-3:30 for wrap up and critique.  Pack a lunch to eat at painting location or back in my studio.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Several Openings for September's Mentoring Class


I have several spots available for September's Online Mentoring Class.
This program will be limited to 12 students at a time.  
Free book, "Ideas for the Landscape Painter" included.
$250 Per Month /  Click to Receive the Course Outline or Sign Up

"I have just completed an online mentoring program with Kim Casebeer and I would highly recommend Kim as an accomplished artist and educator.  Her instruction methods are very easy to grasp and she is very informative in all areas of landscape painting.  After completing this workshop, I feel her direction has been invaluable, and feel this knowledge has greatly enhanced my own painting skills.  I was sorry to see this workshop come to an end!!" 
- Pamela Brickey

"Kim's mentoring program is the best thing I have done to help me grow as an artist. She is thorough with the process and videos, and generous of her time in giving critiques and feedback. I would recommend Kim as a teacher and mentor to anyone who wants to improve as an artist." 
- Beth Cole

Welcome to my mentoring program for landscape painters.  I’ve been teaching workshops for over 10 years.  During that time I have not only helped other artists learn how to improve their art, but I’ve also learned how to become a more effective teacher.  One of my biggest frustrations of teaching workshops is that after the workshop is over there are no guarantees that I will be able to keep in touch with each student to see how their work has improved and if they have been painting since the last workshop.  The only way to truly make a noticeable improvement in ones work is by painting on a regular basis.

That’s why I have decided to focus my teaching energy toward an online mentoring program this year.  These classes are set up as weekly, in-depth lessons that will make you a better painter by breaking down the process into smaller steps.  Instead of throwing everything at you at once because we only have 3 or 5 days, we focus each week on one aspect - line, values, composition, light, color, brush work, etc.  Yes a certain amount of patience is necessary.  But all of these steps are important.  They are what I believe in and they are what works.   Building upon what we’ve learned previously is what routine practice is all about.  Same for musicians, actors, and yes artists!

Other advantages of this online mentoring program is that you can work in your own studio and at your own pace.  There are also no travel expenses.  If you have taken a few workshops, you’ve probably already figured out that the travel expenses are often greater than the workshop itself.

So what can you expect each week?
•    A video demonstration for each lesson that will range from 1 hour up to 2.25 hours depending on topic.  These videos will be sent to you  
by email each Tuesday by 6pm CST, and can be downloaded to your computer so that you can refer to them when you’re ready.
•    A written explanation of the lesson plan that you can quickly refer to while practicing.
•    A personal critique of your artwork and weekly lesson with suggestions for improvement. Submit each completed lesson on the following
Tuesday by email.  The critique will be returned by email by Thursday at 9pm CST.
•    A full outline of the course’s lesson plans will be provided at the beginning of the program.  It will include lessons on line, composition,
value, temperature of color, intensity of color, brushwork and edges, creating atmosphere, types of light, and more.

Who can participate in the class?
You can participate in the class if you:
•    Have basic drawing and painting knowledge.  Even beginners can participate in this class as we will go through ideas step-by-step and   
it’s on an individual basis.
•    Work in oil, pastel, or acrylic media.
•    Can carve out a consistent amount of time during the week for painting.
•    Have an internet connection and computer capable of opening and playing lengthy videos.
•    Have an email program and address to send and receive images for critiquing.
•    Have a digital camera or smart phone capable of taking a photo at least 1200 pixels on the longest side (4 inches wide at 300 dpi).

How do you sign up?
The online mentoring program is paid for on a month to month basis.  The fee is $250.00 per month and includes weekly lessons and critiques.  You may start at the beginning of any month as long as there is room in the program.  All you need to do is send me an email or call indicating you would like to start and I will send you an invoice.  A Paypal invoice will be sent out by the 20th of the month and is due on the 1st of the following month.  You can pay through Paypal or by check.  You can end your mentoring program at any time.

Once you have paid for a month, the videos and lessons can be downloaded to your computer so they will always be available to you.  Each lesson is emailed to you by Tues. 6pm CST each week.  If you are out of town or can’t get to a computer for a few days, you will still have the lesson and can start it once you are ready.  Don’t worry, I will work with you to make sure you can stay on track!

“Kim provides a lot of information in her 18 week mentorship program.  Even though I have been painting for years, much of the information was new, or presented in such a cogent manner that it finally ‘clicked’ for me.  There are a lot of practices I can do over and over to continue to help me improve my skills.  The information and videos provide great insight into what it takes to become a better artist.  I highly recommend doing the mentorship with Kim!” – Bonnie Bowne

This program will be limited to 12 students at a time.
Free book, "Ideas for the Landscape Painter" included.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Why Is Transparent Orange On My Palette?

When teaching workshops, I often get asked why I have certain colors on my palette.  It's difficult to go into an in depth explanation during a demonstration!  So I've decided to dedicate several blog posts to some of the uniqueness of several of the oil colors I love and why I do.  I have to start with one of my favorites - Gamblin's Transparent Orange.

Anyone who has taken an oil painting workshop from me, has heard me gush about this beautiful color.  It's more typical to see Cadmium Orange on an oil painter's palette, but I traded Cadmium Orange in for it's more sophisticated cousin a while ago and haven't regretted it one bit!

Since we are visual people, I'm including some example color blocks one a color mixed with Transparent Orange compared to that same color mixed with something more commonly found on the palette.  In the more opaque colors the difference is harder to see, but look closely - it's there!

We will start with a color block of Transparent Orange and Titanium White, and Transparent Orange alone.

You can see how warm and radiant this color is when mixed with Titanium White.  I didn't make a similar block using Cadmium Orange, but if I had, you would see how much cooler Cadmium Orange is when compared to Transparent Orange.  And, just as the name and the color block on the right suggest, Transparent Orange is, well, transparent.  Cadmium Orange is opaque, as are all other Cadmiums. 


The next color block shows the difference between a Cadmium Orange/Lemon Yellow mix on the left, and a Transparent Orange/Lemon Yellow mix on the right.  Look closely and you can see that the block on the right is warmer and cleaner.  This is key to getting luminosity in skies.  Transparent Orange is my go to color to mix many of the colors in a glowing sunset.


The next color block shows what happens when a Viridian and Titanium White mixture is mixed with Lemon Yellow on the left, and with Transparent Orange on the right.  The left is a cooler green, but the right one has some warmth.  The warmer one is my preference when gradating skies.


Here is another example of warming up a green-blue for skies, this time using a Cobalt Blue and Titanium mixture and adding Lemon Yellow on the left, and Transparent Orange on the right.  Though I use both of these when gradating skies, experience tells me that the one with Transparent Orange on the right is grayed down just a little more than the left one.  This "grayed" blue-green has a more natural feel.


Here's a fun experiment:  the block on the left is Cadmium Red Light.  The block on the right is Alizarin Permanent and Transparent Orange mixed.  They are very close in temperature, but the Alizarin Permanent and Transparent Orange are both transparent colors that when mixed together have a nice, warm glow.  This mix can be useful to make warm greens, a warmer light value red when tinted with Titanium White, and many other uses.


The last two color block sets are greens.  One of my other favorite colors on my palette is Permanent Green Light.  This is an opaque, high chroma, green that is much too bright to use on it's own in a landscape.  However, when mixed with a red or orange, it becomes a beautiful, warm green good for early spring and summer greens.  The color block on the left is Permanent Green and Cadmium Orange, the one in the middle is Permanent Green and Cadmium Red Light, and the one on the right is Permanent Green and Transparent Orange.  Notice the one in the middle is slightly cooler, while the two on the ends (the oranges) are a little warmer.  The one on the right (Transparent Orange) is the cleanest.  Each have great uses - it just depends on what you need.


This last set of blocks is Viridian with Cadmium Orange on the left, Cadmium Red Light in the middle, and Transparent Orange on the right.  The Viridian and Cadmium Red Light mix in the middle is the darkest, coolest and "grayest."  The Cadmium Orange on the left warms up Viridian nicely but is more opaque.  The Transparent Orange and Viridian mixture on the right is the most transparent.  Again, each of these can be useful.  

I hope you've found this helpful, and that it may make you want to give Gamblin's Transparent Orange a try!  Most importantly, I hope you take away from this post that it's necessary to know the properties of the colors on your palette and what they will do when mixed with other colors. 
Don't take my word for it, experiment on your own!

Monday, March 28, 2016

Pond Swell Available on DailyPaintWorks.com

The bidding on this little plein air ends in less than 24 hours! It was painted near my home studio, and depicts a swollen pond during the rainy season. "Pond Swell"
5.5x9 in

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/pond-swell/462502

Pond Swell, oil, 5.5x9

Sunday, March 20, 2016

California and Colorado Pieces Available through DailyPaintWorks.com

This piece was painted in Point Lobos State Park in Central California. When the sun started to go down, the rocks just glowed! Such a beautiful place!  I love to stop here to paint when in the Monterey or Carmel, California area.  "Sundown at Point Lobos"

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/buy/auction/523381

Sundown at Point Lobos, oil, 6x8

This piece was painted near Steamboat Springs, Colorado in Yampa Valley during a wet spring.  Yampa Valley is such a beautiful valley, full of ranches, rolling hills and mountains.

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/buy/auction/530986

Spring in Colorado, oil, 10x8

Sunday, March 13, 2016

New Mexico Landscape up for auction on DailyPaintWorks.com

The big open spaces of New Mexico are great for viewing beautiful sunsets! "New Mexico Landscape" 6x8

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/new-mexico-landscape/450742


New Mexico Landscape, oil, 6x8

Rain Cloud up for auction on DailyPaintWorks.com

Rain Cloud, oil, 6x8

The air started to get cooler as I stood outside, capturing these quick changing thunderheads.

"Rain Cloud" 6x8

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/rain-cloud/450745

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Hedge Apples up for auction on DailyPaintWorks.com

When does a landscape become a still life?  While on a walk, I found an interesting design in this mix of hedge apples, leaves and branches on the ground last fall and had to paint them. "Hedge Apples" oil, 6x8 inches.

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/hedge-apples/450738

Hedge Apples, oil, 6x8

Monday, March 7, 2016

Snow Scene Up For Auction on DailyPaintWorks.com

Today's painting is "Crisp Morning" 6x8, oil.

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/crisp-morning/450736

This was painted from my car on a cold, winter morning after a snowfall.

Crisp Morning, oil, 6x8

Sunday, March 6, 2016

Two New Paintings on DailyPaintWorks.com

I have two new paintings up for auction on DailyPaintWorks.com.

Barn on Deep Creek Road, oil, 6x8
"Barn on Deep Creek Road", is a plein air painting of a quaint, red barn that has been preserved and is along Deep Creek Road, near where I live.

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/barn-on-deep-creek-road/450734

Crevice, oil, 6x8
"Crevice", is a plein air painting I completed while on a driving trip through New Mexico.  To me, this is what I think of when I think of New Mexico - rugged landscape and an interesting mix of neutrals.

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/crevice/450735

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Today's daily painting - "Bradley Lake"

Today's daily painting is an intimate scene of rocks, grasses and fallen timber along the shoreline of Bradley Lake in Grand Teton National Park. "Bradley Lake" 6x8 in. Enjoy!

http://www.dailypaintworks.com/fineart/kim-casebeer/bradley-lake/450730

You can check out my gallery page to see what's available in the future, or if you see something you really want send me an email at kimcasebeer@att.net to buy it before it goes to auction.  This is a great opportunity for collectors to either add to their collection, or perhaps get started collecting with these little gems.
 
Bradley Lake, oil, 6x8


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Garrapata Mood Auction on DailyPaintWorks.com

Here's a new painting up for auction on, DailyPaintWorks.com. Garrapata Mood is an 8x6 oil. I painted this piece in Garrapata State Park, along the central coast of California. It is such a beautiful and inspiring place to paint! 


You can check out my gallery page to see what's available in the future, or if you see something you really want send me an email at kimcasebeer@att.net to buy it before it goes to auction.  This is a great opportunity for collectors to either add to their collection, or perhaps get started collecting with these little gems.  Enjoy!

Garrapata Mood, oil, 8x6
 

Sunday, February 28, 2016

Two New Paintings Up for Auction

G Road, oil, 6x8

I have two new little paintings up for auction on, DailyPaintWorks.comG Road a 6x8 oil has almost 5 days left, and Patio Flowers is a 5.5x9 inch oil with almost 7 days left.

G Road is a plein air painted as a demo during one of my workshops at the Flying W Ranch in the flint hills of Kansas.  I've taken many painting groups there.  I painted Patio Flowers from my back patio during a daily plein air challenge.  It was fun to capture the colorful flowers with loose brush strokes.   
 
Patio Flowers, oil, 5.5x9


You can check out my gallery page to see what's available in the future, or if you see something you really want send me an email at kimcasebeer@att.net to buy it before it goes to auction.

This is a great opportunity for collectors to either add to their collection, or perhaps get started collecting with these little gems.  Enjoy!

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Small Painting Auction Through DailyPaintWorks.com


Clear Evening Sunset, oil, 6x8

One common conversation I have with other painters who work outside a lot is that, "wow we have a lot of little paintings in our studio!"  Sure, some of the gems get framed and sent off to my galleries.  I take stacks of these with me when I teach workshops or otherwise travel and they are available for sale.  Still, I have a lot of great little paintings sitting around my studio that need good homes!  I'm getting ready to do another personal challenge of painting outside every day for at least a month this spring, so I need to make some room.  Which means there's a great opportunity for collectors to either add to their collection, or perhaps get started collecting.  I'm offering these little gems on an art auction website, DailyPaintWorks.comClear Evening Sunset is up for auction right now, and 3 times a week I'll have more go up for auction.  I'll post each auction to my blog.  You can check out my gallery page to see what's available in the future, or if you see something you really want send me an email at kimcasebeer@att.net to buy it before it goes to auction.

Monday, February 22, 2016

Going Through the Painting Process, Studio Work

I get asked (a lot) if I always start a painting with a value study.  I won't lie - no not always.  When I'm outside, I quickly get caught up in the excitement of capturing a scene en plein air and get started.  If you have a smart phone, you can jump start this process by taking a photo, then changing it to grayscale.  This can quickly help you discover any issues the potential composition will have.  Yes that's right, it will almost always have something that won't work.  Seeing the composition in grayscale will help you see correct values.

But when I'm in my studio, I always start with a value study.  This is because I have the luxury of time in my studio.  There is time to look at the potential composition and work out any problems it may have.  There is time to decide on proportions and if the piece should lean toward light values or darker values.  The goal in my studio is usually to work toward creating a larger piece, therefore the process becomes more important.  When outside, I'm in the moment of discovery - this is part of the process.  Therefore the outdoor painting is treated as a study.

A value sketch to get the process started.

Let me walk you through the studio painting process.  As mentioned, first I start with at least several value studies, sometimes notans as well.  These monochromatic sketches are often substituted for one another, but they are two different things.  A notan is only black and white - no gray values.  It's an abstract way to look at your composition as either in light or in shadow.  A value sketch has varying values of gray that accurately represent the values seen in your reference material.  I will always do several value sketches.  If I'm uncertain if a painting should lean toward light or dark, or I want to see the abstract design in a composition, I will create some notans.

Pillsbury Snow Study, oil, 6x8   ©Kim Casebeer
After the monochromatic sketches are complete, I will make a color study.  The size of the study will depend on the desired size of the finished painting.  It may also depend on how much I'm changing things around in the design compared to my photo or plein air references.  If a lot is going to change and I'm unsure of how it will all come together, I'll do a small color study first.  This is typically 6x8 or similar.  If that works, and I think the final piece will be large, I will often create one more color study, perhaps twice the size of the first one.

I'm in the process of working on this snow scene of a local landmark called Pillsbury Crossing.  The crossing is where the bottom of Deep Creek becomes a solid rock bed, capable of being driven across.  There is a lot of overgrown brush along the creek.  I wanted to see if I could simplify it by opening it up, as well as giving it a heavy snow fall to cover more of the rocks.  We haven't had a heavy snow this year so making it up is necessary!  To try this out, I started with a 6x8 color study (after the value sketch).  I felt like it worked and could potentially be a large piece.  But I also know from experience that what works in a 6x8 doesn't always translate to, say 24x30.  I decided to double it, going to a 12x16 color study.  You can see the reference photo plus the two color studies in the image below.

The 6x8 color study, the 12x16 color study, and the reference photo in the bottom left.

I adjusted the rock shapes in the foreground, added a few more loose rocks in the water, broke up the snow banks a little more, and pushed the warm highlights a little more.  There are a few more adjustments I need to make now that I've let the 12x16 sit for a few days.  Overall, I feel like it will be successful larger.  I feel confident in doubling the size once more - to 24x30 or so.  I just made a new, alkyd primed, linen board and am ready to get started.  We'll see where this adventure leads!

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Let's Hear It For Non-Resolutions!

By now, many of you have made a resolution or two.  And if you're like me, maybe you've broken one (or two).  For me, the euphoria that comes from the promise of a new year has worn off.  I'm still having fleeting thoughts that this year could be "the best year yet," but those thoughts keep getting over shadowed by anxiety.

When I started my New Year's resolution list, I immediately thought of all the lofty goals I wanted to achieve.  What shows I wanted to get in, how many sales I wanted to make, even what awards I would aspire to receive (right, like we have some control over that!).  I looked over my list.  Then I started to hyperventilate. 

It seems as a society we are so focused on "fixing" ourselves, rather than to believe in being ourselves!  As artists we aren't immune to the social pressures in which we're exposed.  I can't be the only one who finds spending too much time on social media can become stressful.  Don't get me wrong, I'm very happy for other artists finding success.  I am deeply grateful for the successes I have had in my career thus far and only hope the same for my peers.  Yet, seeing who got into which show, who sold a painting, and who won an award – it's easy to get caught up in what others are doing and start to believe that I need to do all of those things.  Not only is that adding unnecessary stress to my life, but more importantly, it's keeping me from being true to myself as an artist.

So I will ask this question, what if the New Year's non-resolution was to enjoy being ourselves?  An artist's greatest asset may very well be allowing their art to be a mirror of themselves.  You've probably heard the famous Judy Garland quote, "Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else."  I can not think of a better occupation to which this should apply than one in the arts.  Being a first-rate version of yourself should include discovering more about oneself and finding more joy in our daily lives.

I threw away my first resolution list and decided to make a non-resolution list that was fun not forced.  Here's what's on the list (in no particular order):

Prioritize time for daydreaming.
Read more about classic artists and find inspiration in their work.

Make time for warm up exercises.

Experiment with new media and techniques.

Sketch often.
Collect poems that speak to you and imagine them in paint.
Give yourself a plein air challenge when the weather is nice.

Spend time outside observing nature without painting or sketching.  Listen to the sounds, feel the wind and sun, and mentally record colors you see.
It's important to note that I intentionally didn't put anything on this list that made me even the least bit tense.  For example, I could easily have written "Sketch every day," but that felt like it would have been too forced so instead I chose "Sketch often."  That kept the fun not forced rule.  If you love and can't live without sketching every day then including that on your list would be fine.  Fun not forced is the ultimate goal here. 

I'm not suggesting that resolutions are all bad.  And setting goals can certainly be a positive thing.  But 2016 seems like the right time to look inward to find suitable goals, not outward searching for someone else's.  I would be interested to hear if any of you have gone the non-resolution route this year.  What would your 2016 non-resolution list include?

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Announcing my Online Mentoring Program for 2016

This program will be limited to 12 students at a time.  
Free book, "Ideas for the Landscape Painter" included.
$250 Per Month /  Click to Sign Up

Hello and welcome to my mentoring program for landscape painters.  I’ve been teaching workshops for over 10 years - both studio and plein air.  During that time I have not only helped other artists learn how to improve their art, but I’ve also learned how to become a more effective teacher.  One of my biggest frustrations of teaching workshops is that after the workshop is over there are no guarantees that I will be able to keep in touch with each student to see how their work has improved and if they need additional help.  Often I see a student again, but perhaps a year has passed.  Some have improved a lot, and some students admit to not working much since the last workshop.  The only way to truly make a noticeable improvement in ones work is by painting on a regular basis.  I would love to teach a class that meets once or twice a week, but I live in a small town in Kansas and many of my workshop students live 2 or more hours away, even from out-of-state.  It’s not reasonable to think that they would travel to my studio each week.

That’s why I have decided to focus my teaching energy toward an online mentoring program this year.  These classes are set up as weekly, in-depth lessons that will make you a better painter by breaking down the process into smaller steps.  Instead of throwing everything at you at once because we only have 3 or 5 days, we focus each week on one aspect - line, values, composition, light, color, brush work, etc.  Yes a certain amount of patience is necessary because we won’t just dive in and paint.  But all of these steps are important.  They are what I believe in and they are what works.  I am not much of a sports enthusiast, but I have become a runner.  I’ve completed several half-marathons and would never dream of showing up at a race having never practiced.  Instead I follow a plan that adds miles to my practices each week until I build up to running 13.1 miles.  Building upon what we’ve learned previously is what routine practice is all about.  Same for musicians, actors, and yes artists!

Other advantages of this online mentoring program is that you can work in your own studio and at your own pace.  There are also no travel expenses.  If you have taken a few workshops, you’ve probably already figured out that the travel expenses are often greater than the workshop itself.

So what can you expect each week?

•   A video demonstration for each lesson that will range from 45 minutes up to 1 1/2 hours
    depending on topic.  The video will explain and demonstrate the lesson’s goals.  These videos
    will be sent to you by email each Tuesday by 6pm CST, and can be downloaded to your
    computer so that you can refer to them when you’re ready.
•   A written explanation of the lesson plan that you can quickly refer to while practicing.
•   A personal critique of your artwork and weekly lesson with suggestions for improvement. 
    Submit each completed lesson on the following Tuesday by email.  The critique will be returned
    by email by Thursday at 9pm CST.
•   A full outline of the course’s lesson plans will be provided at the beginning of the program.  It
    will include lessons on line, composition, value, temperature of color, intensity of color,
    brushwork and edges, creating atmosphere, types of light, and more.  We will also add goal setting 
    later in the program.
•   Each student receives a free copy of my book, "Ideas for the Landscape Painter."

Who can participate in the class?
You can participate in the class if you:
•    Have basic drawing and painting knowledge.  Even beginners can participate in this class as 
     we will go through ideas step-by-step and it’s on an individual basis.
•    Work in oil, pastel, or acrylic media.
•    Can carve out a consistent amount of time during the week for painting.
•    Have an internet connection and computer capable of opening and playing lengthy videos.
•    Have an email program and address to send and receive images for critiquing.
•    Have a digital camera or smart phone with HDR capable of taking a photo at least 2400 pixels
      on the longest side (8 inches wide at 300 dpi).

How do you sign up?
The online mentoring program is paid for on a month to month basis.  The fee is $250.00 per month and includes weekly lessons and critiques.  You may start at the beginning of any month as long as there is room in the program.  All you need to do is send me an email or call indicating you would like to start and I will send you an invoice.  A Paypal invoice will be sent out by the 20th of the month and is due on the 1st of the following month.  You can pay through Paypal or by check.  You can end your mentoring program at any time.

After paying for the first month, I will send you a list of suggested supplies, tips for taking good photographs, and ideas that will help you set up for a successful lesson.

Once you have paid for a month, the videos and lessons can be downloaded to your computer so they will always be available to you.  Each lesson is emailed to you by Tuesday 6pm CST each week.  If you are out of town or can’t get to a computer for a few days, you will still have the lesson and can start it once you are ready.  I know that life happens.  I have weeks where I travel and can’t get as much painting in.  I try to make up for this by spending more time painting in the studio the following week.  Don’t worry, I will work with you to make sure you can stay on track!

This program will be limited to 12 students at a time.
Free book, "Ideas for the Landscape Painter" included.
$250 Per Month / Click to Sign Up